NICK SHEPHERD CV

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IN BRIEF


  • “Nick Shepherd’s delvings into the underground of the discipline are part of an honourable effort to save archaeology from its past, an effort that starts with recognizing dig sites for what they have always been: the sacred ground of the dispossessed” – JM Coetzee, Nobel Prize winning author and critic (2014).
  • “Shepherd’s work [is] among the best in his generation, and is a credit to the University of Cape Town” – Martin Hall, President of the World Archaeological Congress (2002).

DEGREES


  • PhD in Archaeology (University of Cape Town, 1998. Archaeology and Postcolonialism in South Africa.) Supervisor: Martin Hall. Examiners: Barbara Bender, Matthew Johnson, Peter Ucko.
  • BA – 1988 UCT (with distinction), BA Hons – 1989 UCT (with distinction)

POSITIONS


  • Current: A. Lindsay O’Connor Visiting Professor of American Institutions, Colgate University.
  • Current: Associate Professor of Archaeology and African Studies, University of Cape Town. Convener of the graduate programme in Heritage and Public Culture in Africa.
  • 2012-2015: Head of the African Studies Unit of the New School of African and Gender Studies at the University of Cape Town.
  • 2005-2012: Editor-in-chief of Archaeologies: Journal of the World Archaeological Congress (New York: Springer Press).
  • 2009: Visiting Associate Professor in the Centre for African Studies and the Programme for Science Studies, University of Basel, Switzerland.
  • 2008: Visiting Associate Professor of Archaeology and Africana Studies, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Department of Africana Studies, and the John Nicholas Brown Institute for the Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage, Brown University.
  • 2004-2008: Member of the Executive Committee of the World Archaeological Congress.
  • 2004-2005: Mandela Fellow, W.E.B. Du Bois Institute, Harvard University.
  • 2000-2008: Lecturer, later Senior Lecturer, in the Centre for African Studies, University of Cape Town.
  • 1999: Postdoctoral Fellow in the Research Unit for the Archaeology of Cape Town.

GRANTS AND AWARDS


  • In preparation: European Commission Horizon 2020 grant application on “Colonial and Postcolonial Heritage”, in collaboration with colleagues from the Sustainable Heritage Management programme at Aarhus University.
  • 2015: travel grant and faculty development grant from Colgate University’s Research Council.
  • 2015: finalist in the “Archaeology for the People” essay competition, run by Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World.
  • 2014: co-applicant with Jan Ifversen on a SANORD start-up grant allowing mobility between Aarhus University and the University of Cape Town.
  • 2014: co-applicant with colleagues from the Centre for African Studies at Dalarna University, Sweden, on a Linnaeus Palme mobility grant, allowing faculty and student travel between Dalarna University and the University of Cape Town for up to seven years.
  • 2013: HUMANITEC grant for a digital heritage project involving the digitization of rock art site reports and images from the collection of the IZIKO South African Museum.
  • 2000-the present: numerous grants from the National Research Foundation of South Africa.
  • 2000-present: numerous grants from the University of Cape Town’s Faculty Research Committee (FRC) and University Research Committee (URC).
  • 2002: first prize in the Archaeological Dialogues essay competition on the future of archaeology, for the paper “Heading South, Looking North. Why we need a Post-Colonial Archaeology”. Martin Hall, then President of the World Archaeological Congress, commented: “This is a major achievement. The award recognises Shepherd’s work as among the best in his generation, and is a credit to UCT” (Monday Paper 21(14): 2).

KEYNOTES


  • 2015: “Un-disciplining culture and sustainability: deep ontologies, regimes of care, material presence and transgenerational time”. RE-DO: Conference on sustainability and culture’s role in sustainable futures, Aarhus, October 2015.
  • 2013: “Land and memory”. GIPCA conference on Land, Prestwich Street Memorial, Cape Town, October 2013. https://vimeo.com/108183475
  • 2010: “The Location of Theory”. Opening plenary session of TAG2010 (Theoretical Archaeology Group) at Brown University, with Homi Bhabha, Omur Harmansah, Alejandro Haber, Yannis Hamilakis, and Uzma Rizvi.
  • 2009: “Archaeology, Coloniality. Modernity”. Opening keynote address, Conference on Contemporary and Historical Archaeology and Theory (CHAT 2009), Keble College, University of Oxford.
  • 2007: “Archaeology at the sharp edge of the trowel”. Conference on Archaeology and Ethical Globalisation, Flinders University.

RESEARCH


FIELDS

Heritage Studies, Postcolonial Archaeology, Public Archaeology, Indigenous Archaeology, Archaeological Theory, African Studies, Visual Studies.

ORIENTATIONS AND KEYWORDS

Knowledge politics, history of ideas, heritage, memory, restitution, digital heritage, the global south, social movements, subaltern epistemologies

CURRENT PROJECTS

I have four current projects. The first is focused on archaeology, social movements and the politics of memory and identity (“At the Sharp Edge of the Trowel”: Archaeology, social movements and the politics of memory and identity). I am interested in the way in which archaeological/ heritage sites, material cultures and human remains become points of mobilization and struggle in a subaltern politics of memory and identity.

A second project is concerned with elaborating the conceptual basis of a decolonial archaeology under the heading of Archaeology, Coloniality, Modernity. Drawing on the resources of postcolonial and decolonial theory, and on contemporary contexts of practice, we re-think the tangled inheritance of archaeology as a knowledge project in the twinned contexts of colonialism and modernity. This is a collaborative project carried out with Walter Mignolo, and the archaeologists Alejandro Haber and Cristobal Gnecco.

A third project is a site-based heritage residency focused around themes of climate change and social justice, under the heading of Heritage and Sustainable Human Futures. This is a comparative north/ south project, carried out in collaboration with the Critical Heritage Studies clusters of the University of Gothenburg. The first heritage residency was held in Cape Town in December 2015, and involved a group of twelve scholars, heritage practitioners and creative artists traversing the mountains of the Cape peninsula. A second heritage residency is planned for Kiruna in Sweden’s far-north. http://www.curatorialresidency.org

A fourth project is a digital heritage project involving digitizing rock art site reports and historical and contemporary rock art images from the collection of the IZIKO South African Museum. This is a pilot project carried out with a HUMANITEC grant, in partnership with the South African Museum. See the report, From Cave to Screen, which describes this as a “trailblazing collaborative project”.

http://www.digitalcollections.lib.uct.ac.za/humanitec/iziko

JOURNALS


I was founder-editor of the journal Archaeologies: Journal of the World Archaeological Congress (New York: Springer Press), together with K. Anne Pyburn (2005-2010) and Cristobal Gnecco (2010-2012). Archaeolgies is covered in the ISI Arts and Humanities Citation Index, and is rated “A” in the Australian Research Council Humanities and Creative Arts journal index.

I was lead-editor on the following themed issues and exchanges:

  • Twenty years on: WAC and One World Archaeology Today (with Martin Hall, Claire Smith, Peter Stone, Larry Zimmerman, Alejandro Haber et al)
  • Intersections between Feminist and Indigenous Archaeologies (with Margaret W Conkey, Laurajane Smith, Dorothy Lippert, Alejandra Korstanje et al)
  • Archaeology, colonialism and contested modernities (with guest editors Charles R Cobb and Diana D Loren)
  • Formulations of heritage in politically contested contexts (with guest editors Ann Killebrew and Patrice Jeppson)
  • Debating Indigenous Knowledge (with Lesley Green and Kai Horsthemke)
  • Archaeo-ethnography and auto-archaeology (with guest editors Rodney Harrison and John Schofield)
  • Experience, modes of engagement, archaeology (with guest editor Krysta Ryzewski)
  • Archaeological perspectives on the recent past (with guest editors Brent Fortenberry and Adrian Myers)

BOOKS


  • Murray, N, N. Shepherd and M. Hall (eds.) (2007) Desire Lines; Space, memory and identity in the post-apartheid city. Oxford: Routledge

Described by its reviewers as “a comprehensive and singularly authoritative volume that charts the development of new and emergent public cultures in post apartheid South Africa through the making and unmaking of its urban spaces”.

  • Shepherd, N and S. Robins (eds.) (2008) New South African Keywords. Cape Town: Jacana Media and Ohio University Press.

Carolyn Hamilton comments: “New South African Keywords is not just an invaluable handbook that will be mined by commentators, scholars, policy analysts and thinkers of all kinds probing the complexity of important contemporary terms. The essays and the thoughtful editors’ introduction combine to provide a much-needed overview of contemporary public discourse and its critique”.

Read the Mail and Guardian review at http://mg.co.za/article/2008-11-26-word-power

  • Haber, A and N. Shepherd (eds.) (2014) After Ethics: Ancestral voices and postdisciplinary worlds in archaeology. New York: Springer Press.
  • Shepherd N (2015) The Mirror in the Ground: Archaeology, photography and the making of a disciplinary archive. Cape Town: Jonathan Ball Publishers and the Centre for Curating the Archive.

JM Coetzee, winner of the 2003 Nobel Prize for Literature, comments: “Human archaeology in southern Africa has since its beginnings been implicated in the projects of evolutionism and biological racism. Nick Shepherd’s delvings into the underground of the discipline are part of an honourable effort to save archaeology from its past, an effort that starts with recognizing dig sites for what they have always been: the sacred ground of the dispossessed. The Mirror in the Ground offers us a fresh way of looking at the photographic archive, with a commentary as moving and compassionate as it is unsettling” (April 2014).

The Mirror in the Ground is also published online, in a site designed by Niek de Greef http://mirrorintheground.com. In May 2015 the book and website were launched at an exhibition in the Centre for African Studies Gallery, curated by Siona O’Connell and Nick Shepherd http://www.cca.uct.ac.za/projects/the-mirror-in-the-ground/

  • Shepherd, N, Gnecco, C and A. Haber (2016) Arqueología y decolonialidad [Archaeology and Decoloniality]. Buenos Aires: Ediciones del Signo and the Centre for Global Studies and the Humanities, Duke University.
  • Shepherd, N, Gnecco, C and A. Haber (2018, in press) Archaeology and Decoloniality. Durham, North Carolina: Duke University Press.
  • Shepherd, N. (in press) La Mano del Arqueologo: Ensayos 2001-2015. [The Hand of the Archaeologist: Essays 2001-2015]. Jointly published by Universidad del Cauca (Colombia), JAS Arqueología (Spain) and Noches Blancas (Argentina).

JOURNAL ARTICLES


  • Shepherd, N., (2001). Alternatives to what? Debating new heritage practises in South Africa: Reflections on the Mapping Alternatives Conference. World Archaeological Bulletin, 15, 1-3.
  • Shepherd, N., (2001). Careful Now! Teaching “race” in South Africa. Monday Paper; Weekly newspaper of the University of Cape Town, 20(20), 6.
  • Shepherd, N., (2001). Crossing the Street: Navigating through racism’s heavy traffic. Rhodes Journalism Review, 20, 40.
  • Shepherd, N., (2001). The Politic Body: Contesting Difference with the Tshwaragano/ In Touch Integrated Dance Project. Africa e Mediterraneo,
  • Shepherd, N., (2002). Disciplining Archaeology: The Invention of South African Prehistory, 1923-1953. Kronos, (28), 127-45.
  • Shepherd, N., (2002). Heading South, Looking North. Why we need a post-colonial archaeology. Archaeological Dialogues, 9(2), 74-82.
  • Shepherd, N., (2002). The Politic Body: When the drama of past conflict has been written on the bodies of its subjects. Animated, Spring, 6-8.
  • Shepherd, N., (2002). The Politics of Archaeology in Africa. Annual Review of Anthropology, 31, 189-209.
  • Shepherd, N. & K. Mathers, (2002). Who’s watching Big Brother? Reality television and cultural power in South Africa. Africa e Mediterraneo, 38, 67-9.
  • Shepherd, N., (2003). State of the Discipline: Science, culture and identity in South African archaeology. Journal of Southern African Studies, 29(4), 823-44.
  • Shepherd, N., (2003). WAC5: In the belly of the beast. Public Archaeology, 4(2), 100-3.
  • Shepherd, N., (2003). “When the hand that holds the trowel is black…”. Disciplinary practices of self-representation and the issue of “native” labour in archaeology. Journal of Social Archaeology, 3(3), 334-52.
  • Shepherd, N., (2004). Heading South, Looking North: Why we need a postcolonial archaeology Public Archaeology, 3(4), 248-56.
  • Shepherd, N., (2005). Who is doing courses in archaeology at South African universities? And what are they studying? South African Archaeological Bulletin, 60(182), 123-6.
  • Shepherd, N., (2007). Archaeology Dreaming; postapartheid urban imaginaries and the bones of the Prestwich Street dead. Journal of Social Archaeology, 7(1), 3-28.
  • Shepherd, N., N. Lahiri, J. Watkins & L. Zimmerman, (2007). Dialogos Desde el Sur: Foro Virtual: Arqueologia descolonization. Arqueologia Suramericana, 3(1), 3-19.
  • Shepherd, N., N. Lahiri, J. Watkins & L. Zimmerman, (2007). Virtual Forum: Archaeology and decolonization. Archaeologies: Journal of the World Archaeological Congress, 3(3), 390-412.
  • Shepherd, N. & C. Ernsten, (2007). Urban imaginaries and memories of violence: Cape Town’s Prestwich Street. Volume, 11, 138-41.
  • Shepherd, N. & A. Haber, (2011). What’s Up with WAC? Archaeology and “engagement” in a globalized world. Public Archaeology, 10(2), 96-115.
  • Shepherd, N. (2012). The Uncreated Man: A story of archaeology and imagination. Archaeological Dialogues 19(2): 171-194.
  • Shepherd, N. & O. Harmansah (2012). The Location of Theory. Archaeologies: Journal of the World Archaeological Congress 8(1), 52-54.
  • Shepherd, N. & A. Haber, (2013). Counter-practices of Global Life. Public Archaeology, 10(3), 58-64.
  • Shepherd, N. (2015). The law, the market and the discipline of archaeology: an undisciplined reading. International Journal of Historical Archaeology 19(4).
  • Shepherd, N. (in press). Debating ethics in African archaeology. Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa. 49(2).

CHAPTERS IN BOOKS


  • Shepherd, N., (2004). Pre-colonial Histories (Southern Africa), in Historical Companion to Postcolonial Literatures, eds. D. Johnson & P. Poddar.
  • Shepherd, N., (2005). Roots and Wings: Heritage Studies in the Humanities, in Shifting Boundaries of Knowledge; a view on social sciences, law and humanities in Africa, eds. T. Marcus & A. Hofmanner Durban: University of KwaZulu Press, 125-40.
  • Shepherd, N., (2006). What Does it Mean to Give the Past Back to the People? Archaeology and Ethics in the Post-colony, in Archaeology and Capitalism: From Ethics to Politics, eds. Y. Hamilakis & P. Duke London: UCL Press, 99-114.
  • Shepherd, N. & S. Lawrence, (2006). Historical Archaeology and Colonialism, in The Cambridge Companion to Historical Archaeology, eds. D. Hicks & M. Beaudry Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 69-86.
  • Shepherd, N. & N. Murray, (2007). Introduction: Space, memory and identity in the postapartheid city, in Desire Lines: Space, memory and identity in the postapartheid city, eds. N. Murray, N. Shepherd & M. Hall Oxford: Routledge, 1-18.
  • Shepherd, N. & C. Ernsten, (2007). The World Below: Postapartheid urban imaginaries and the remains of the Prestwich Street dead, in Desire Lines: Space, memory and identity in the postapartheid city, eds. N. Murray, N. Shepherd & M. Hall Oxford: Routledge, 215-32.
  • Shepherd, N. & S. Robins, (2008). Introduction: New South African keywords, in New South African Keywords, eds. N. Shepherd & S. Robins Johannesburg and Athens, Ohio: Jacana and Ohio University Press, 1-12.
  • Shepherd, N., (2008). Heritage, in New South African Keywords, eds. N. Shepherd & S. Robins Cape Town and Athens, Ohio: Jacana Media and Ohio University Press, 116-128.
  • Shepherd, N., (2011). Archaeology Dreaming: Postapartheid urban imaginaries and the remains of the Prestwich Street dead, in New Perspectives in Global Public Archaeology, eds. K. Okamura & A. Matsuda New York: Springer, 155-66.
  • Shepherd, N., (2011). Showing, Telling, Looking: Intimate encounters in the making of South African archaeology, in The Archaeology of Colonialism: Intimate encounters and sexual effects, eds. B. Voss & E. Casella Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 290-302.
  • Shepherd, N., (2013). Archaeology in the Postcolony: Disciplinary entrapments, subaltern epistemologies, in The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of the Contemporary World, eds. P. Graves-Brown, R. Harrison & A. Piccini Oxford: Oxford University Press, 425-436.
  • Shepherd, N., (2012). Historical Archaeology in Africa, in The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, ed. N. Silberman Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Shepherd, N., (2012). The Humility of Sarah Baartman: Materiality, memory, experience and contrapuntal accounts, in Modern Materials: Proceedings from the Contemporary and Historical Archaeology and Theory Conference 2009, eds. B. Fortenberry & L. McAtackney Oxford: British Archaeological Reports, 119-121.
  • Shepherd, N. (2012). Ruin Memory: A hauntology of Cape Town. Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the tropes of modernity. A. Gonzalez-Ruibal. Oxford: Routledge, 233-243.
  • Shepherd, N. & A. Haber, (2014). The Hand of the Archaeologist: Historical catastrophe, regimes of care, excision, relationality, undisciplinarity, in Courature, eds. C. Hamilton & P. Skotnes. Cape Town: Jacana Media, 110-123.
  • Shepherd, N. (2014). The humility of Sarah Baartman, in S. Inggs ed. Object Relations: Essays and images. Cape Town: Michaelis School of Fine Art: 46-49.
  • N. (2014). Undisciplining Archaeological Ethics. In: Haber, A and N. Shepherd (eds.) After Ethics: Ancestral voices and postdisciplinary worlds in archaeology. New York: Springer Press.
  • Shepherd, N. 2015. Digging Deep: A hauntology of Cape Town. In: John Cherry and Felipe Rojas (eds.) Archaeology for the People: Joukowsky Institute Perspectives. Oxford: Oxbow Books: 96-107.
  • Shepherd, N. (in press). Contract Archaeology in South Africa: traveling theory, local memory and global designs, in C. Gnecco, J. Watkins and L. Field eds. [working title: contract archaeology volume] University of Arizona Press.

EDITORIALS


  • Shepherd, N., (2005). From “One World Archaeology” to One world: many archaeologies. Archaeologies: Journal of the World Archaeological Congress, 1(1), 1-4.
  • Shepherd, N., (2005). South-South Exchange. Archaeologies: Journal of the World Archaeological Congress, 1(2), 3-4.
  • Shepherd, N., (2006). Archaeology at the Sharp Edge of the Trowel. Archaeologies: Journal of the World Archaeological Congress, 2(2), 1-2.
  • Shepherd, N., (2006). Local Practice, Global Discipline. Archaeologies: Journal of the World Archaeological Congress, 2(1), 1-2.
  • Shepherd, N., (2007). Eavesdropping on a Global Conversation. Archaeologies: Journal of the World Archaeological Congress, 3(1), 1-2.
  • Shepherd, N., (2008). WAC at a Crossroads. Archaeologies: Journal of the World Archaeological Congress, 4(1), 1-4.
  • Shepherd, N., (2011). Debating WAC. Archaeologies: Journal of the World Archaeological Congress,7(2), 311.

COMMENTS AND RESPONSES


  • Shepherd, N., (2001). Comments on Part II: Far from home, in Contested landscapes: movement, exile and place, eds. B. Bender & M. Winer Oxford: Berg, 349-57.
  • Shepherd, N., (2002). Comments on the Ndoro and Pwiti article [Public Archaeology, 2(1), 2001]. Public Archaeology, 2(2), 124-5.
  • Shepherd, N., (2003). Encyclopeadic Desire: Response to HL Gates “The Encyclopaedia Africana”. Social Dynamics, 29(1), 145-51.
  • Shepherd, N., (2003). “The Modest Violet”: Response to “The Burkitt Affair Revisited”. Archaeological Dialogues, 10(1), 33-9.
  • Shepherd, N., (2010). Comment on “Clockpunk Anthropology and the Ruins of Modernity”. Current Anthropology, 51(6), 785-6.
  • Shepherd, N., (2012). The Spectre of Apartheid: Response to Anders Gustafsson and Hakan Karlsson. Current Swedish Archaeology, 49-52.

TEACHING


PROGRAMMES

The African Studies Unit is a postgraduate teaching and research centre located in the Faculty of Humanities of the University of Cape Town. In 2004 I founded the Masters and PhD programme in Heritage and Public Culture in Africa, which I have convened since that time. This is a leading Heritage Studies programme in Africa and in the global south, and attracts an international cohort of students. The programme on Heritage and Public Culture in Africa focuses on questions of public history and memory, archive and curation, and restitution and social justice. Recent directions have focused on questions of climate change and social justice, taking a lead from historian Dipesh Chakrabarty in thinking about heritage “in the shadow of the Anthropocene”.

The core course for the programme in Heritage and Public Culture in Africa is the course “Critical Issues in Heritage Studies”. Students choose electives from among the other graduate courses offered by the African Studies Unit.

COURSES

I currently convene, or have convened the following courses:

  • CAS1001S Africa: Culture, Identity and Globalisation

A service course for non-Humanities students, which aims to introduce them to range of debates in the field of African Studies.

  • CAS2001S Culture, Identity and Globalisation in Africa

Under the heading of “thinking Africa Differently”, this course takes up the challenge of translating the notion of epistemic decolonisation into curriculum terms accessible to undergraduate students.

  • CAS4003X Images of Africa

This course aims to develop a critical understanding of the manner in which Africa has been imaged and reproduced, including indigenous and outsider images of Africa; images propagated locally and abroad; and images in multiple media, print, film and digital

  • CAS4004X Debates in African Studies; Race and Racism (2000/ 2001)

An introduction to the work of some of the key thinkers and writers of Africa, within the context of debates around issues of race and racism.

  • CAS4005Z Race, Culture and Identity in Africa

An introductory course for non-Humanities students which explores issues of race, culture and identity in an African context.

  • CAS4006Z Public Culture in Africa

This course explores issues in public culture as they affect Africa in a global context. Through detailed examples, it examines how public culture is shaped, and how the expression of identity and difference is played out through spaces and buildings, heritage, music and literature.

  • CAS 4007Z Public Archaeology in Africa (2001-3)

An exploration of issues and debates in the field of Public Archaeology, with a practical bent.

  • CAS4010Z Collection, Representation and Display, Constructing Africa through its Material Culture

This course looks at the relationship between collection, representation and display, in the context of the construction of knowledges in and of Africa. A particular focus is on how material culture is conceptualised as “heritage”, and how this heritage is reproduced through contemporary material cultural practices.

  • CAS4011Z Public Culture Internship

A guided internship that allows students to work in an institution of public culture under supervision. Students in the course have interned in the following organisations: the Robben Island Museum, the National Gallery, the National Library, the Heritage Agency, and the Cape Town City Council.

  • AXL4206S Decolonial Theory

A course that engages with the growing body of thinking and practice under the heading of “decolonial theory”. Our point of entry is the idea of “reading decolonial theory from the Cape”.

  • AXL5203S Critical Issues in Heritage Studies

A course that engages with the field of critical heritage studies, and looks at currently breaking issues. Topics include: the politics of memory and identity, questions of repatriations and reburial, the politics of heritage, the role of global heritage agencies, and local heritage issues and contestations.

I have taught on the following courses convened by my colleagues in the Centre for African Studies:

  • CAS4004X Debates in African Studies: Intellectuals of the African Liberation

An examination of key works from the intellectuals of the African liberation.

  • CAS4009V Race, Culture and Identity in Africa

An introductory half-course for non-Humanities students which explores issues of race, culture and identity in an African context.

  • CAS5202F Problematizing the Study of Africa

This course seeks to demonstrate the complex relationship between power and knowledge, within the context of the history of Africa since colonialism and the development of the disciplines that study this continent.

SUPERVISION


PhD

  • Jesmael Mataga [Museum and heritage practices in colonial and postcolonial Zimbabwe]. Completed 2015.
  • Siona O’Connell [Photography, memory, and forced removals from District Six, Capoe Town]. Completed 2012.
  • Noeleen Murray “Structure and Agency; a critical inquiry into the work of architect and urban designer Roelof Uytenbogaardt”. Completed 2010.
  • Meghna Singh [Oceanic trade mobilities and the heritage of slavery at the Cape]. In progress.
  • Christian Ernsten [The heritage of Cape Town’s District One and District Six]. In progress.
  • Thabo Manetsi [The National Liberation Heritage Trail in Southern Africa]. In progress.
  • Erica de Greef [Dress and fashion as heritage]. In progress.
  • Stephen Symons [Whiteness, masculinities and victimhood: conscript experiences in the South African Defence Force]. In progress.
  • Louise Akanlu [Nankani women’s visual arts and systems of thought]. In progress.
  • Bandile Gumbi [Visual arts periodicals in Africa]. In progress.
  • Alice Womersley [Andrew Lang and the visual imagination]. In progress.

Research Masters

  • Lincoln Theo “The modified body in post-colonial society: explorations of race, culture and identity through embodied experience”. Graduated 2005.
  • Jon Weinberg “Designing Memory: The Making of the Cape Town Holocaust Museum”. In progress.
  • Haajira Esau [Processes of public memory and the making of the District Six Museum]. In progress.
  • Dimala Wicksteed [Indigenous identity politics in Southern Africa]. In progress.

MPhil in Public Culture and Heritage

  • Irene Mafune “Social Consultation: A personal exploration of working relations and challenges faced by site developers, archaeologists and local communities using Dzata site as a case study”. Graduated 2004.
  • Pernille Nesje “Representing the Past in the Present with the Furure in Mind: A close reading of the Cell Stories Exhibition at the Robben Island Museum”. Graduated 2005.
  • Kim Wildman “The Beach; The Making and Remaking of Coffee Bay 1945-2005” Graduated with distinction 2005.
  • Genevieve Fisher “Y-Culture and the Challenges of Subculture in Post-apartheid South Africa”. Graduated 2005.
  • Moliehi Ramakau-Ntene “Exploring the Tourism Potential of Heritage Sites: the case of the Botha Bothe Plateau in Lesotho”. Graduated 2006.
  • Jill Weintroub “From Tin Trunk to World Wide Memory: The making of the Bleek Collection”. Graduated with distinction 2006.
  • Christian Ernsten “Stylizing Cape Town: Problematizing the heritage management of Prestwich Street”. Graduated with distinction 2006.
  • Laura Gibson ““Utopian fantasies of the perfected imperial prospect and fractured images of unresolved ambivalence and unsuppressed resistance”: the Groote Schuur landscape considered as an imperial dream topography of Cecil John Rhodes, 1890-1929”. Graduated 2006.
  • Anna Luty “A Kalahari Family: the making of a family, a filmmaker and a film”. Graduated 2007.
  • Jan-Christof Schenk “The Making of a New South African Craft: Township craft and development discourse in post-apartheid Cape Town”. Graduated 2007.
  • Daniel Steyn “Queering the City: A social and spatial account of the Mother City Queer Project at the Cape Town International Convention Centre in 2003”. Graduated with distinction 2007.
  • Thabo Manetsi “Making Intangibles Tangible: Writing heritage policy for intangible heritage in South Africa”. Graduated 2007.
  • Gerard Ralphs [Sites of Conscience: Prestwich Street and New York’s African Burial Ground compared]. Graduated with distinction 2008.
  • Siona O’Connell [Heritage Tourism in South Afriuca]
  • Rosemary Bangham [The ethnographic photography of Alfred Duggan-Cronin]. Graduated 2013.
  • InSoo Hong [Contested heritage at Japan’s Hashima Island]. Graduated 2015.
  • Robyn-Leigh Cedras [Ethnographic displays at the IZIKO South African Museum]. Under examination.
  • Vanessa Letch [heritage-based topic to be decided]. In progress.
  • Gabrielle Goliath [visual arts and heritage]. In progress.
  • Rosemary Lombard [archives and heritage]. In progress.

LEADERSHIP, SOCIAL RESPONSIVNESS AND PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES


PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS

  • Executive Committee of the World Archaeological Congress (2004-8).
  • Research associate in the Project on Public Pasts (University of Cape Town/ University of the Western Cape), a National Research Foundation funded research unit.
  • Founder member (with Anthony Bogues) of the Trilateral Reconnections Project (TRP), a research and teaching collaboration between the Centre for African Studies (UCT), the Africana Studies Department at Brown University, and the Centre for Caribbean Thought at the University of the West Indies.
  • Associate of the Project for Science Studies in the South (UCT), and Project Leader of the “Project on Science and Society in Africa” (2007-9).

EDITORIAL BOARDS


  • Archaeological Dialogues (Cambridge University Press), 2006-9.
  • Current Swedish Archaeology (Nordic Academic Press), current.
  • Public Archaeology (Institute of Archaeology, University College London).

CONFERENCES AND WORKSHOPS


I planned and hosted, or was lead applicant on, the following conferences and workshops:

  • September 2001: Mapping Alternatives; Debating new heritage practices in South Africa. Conference jointly hosted by the Research Unit for the Archaeology of Cape Town (UCT) and Project on Public Pasts (UWC).
  • August 2002: Critical Heritage Practice in South Africa. Conference jointly hosted by the Research Unit for the Archaeology of Cape Town (UCT) and Project on Public Pasts (UWC).
  • October 2006: Conference on African and African Diasporic Knowledges, Centre for African Studies Gallery. Jointly hosted by the Centre for African Studies, the Centre for Caribbean Studies at the University of the West Indies, and the Africana Studies Department at Brown University.
  • December 2007: Workshop on Public Histories of Slavery at the Cape. Convened with Martin Hall and Crain Soudien, in association with the District Six Museum Foundation and the Prestwich Street Projects Committee.
  • December 2011: Thinking Africa and the African Diaspora Differently. Conference jointly hosted by the Centre for African Studies (UCT), the Centre for Caribbean Studies at the University of the West Indies, the Africana Studies Department at Brown University, and the Faculty of Humanities at Addis Ababa University.

CONSULTANCIES


  • 2001-7: Academic Liaison Officer and Study Centre Director at the University of Cape Town for the University of California Study Abroad Programme.
  • 2009-2015: Academic Advisor, IES Abroad Cape Town.

“Nick Shepherd’s delvings into the underground of the discipline are part of an honourable effort to save archaeology from its past, an effort that starts with recognizing dig sites for what they have always been: the sacred ground of the dispossessed” – JM Coetzee, Nobel Prize winning author and critic (2014).